Two Women – One Mission

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Just wanting to share this story as much as I can. For those of you who don’t know not only is my husband in the Army but so is my sister-in-law. Madeleine is currently stationed in Afghanistan and needing some of our help with her efforts. Our family received this email a few days ago along with the photo below. I also created a Facebook page to help have  “meeting ” place so you can click here. If you are interested in helping out please leave a comment with your email and I will get in touch with you directly. Thanks!

“The school always needs writing paper, craft paper, pens and pencils. I bring her some, but they are pretty low quality things. Since they are girls, they love girl stuff like nail polish and cheap makeup to play with at home. Silly bracelets, earrings and hair barrettes are fun, too. The students range from 6-16, with the majority being high school age. Nafiza is very focused on teaching her girls skills that they can use to earn money – embroidery, beading, sewing, canning and baking. She runs an NGO (non-government organization) that I am trying to get funded for a couple different projects.

Nafiza is a brave woman who, when the security of her school was threatened, confronted the Taliban leadership in the area to reach an understanding that her school should be left alone. She convinced them that the work she is doing poses no threat to them. Her efforts to build peace in her village are recognized throughout the province and she is the only woman from her district selected to be a part of the Provincial Peace Council (an Afghan organization that works to reintegrate moderate Taliban fighters back into legal society by providing job training and religious support).

Nafiza wears a burqa and is every bit the traditional Afghan Muslim woman – she greets me with kisses and Muslim blessings – but she is passionate about building the economic capacity of the female work force under the new Afghan constitution. I am helping her with some women’s legal rights programs that, if she goes through with, could put her life at risk. I tell her these things and she says, “Mariam, I have to do this for my sisters. I am not afraid.” She is well into middle age and thinks nothing of marching unarmed and alone into war-torn villages in her burqa and telling the Taliban to knock it off. How can I not love her?”

 

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One response »

  1. Wow, this is the type of story that needs to be told about our American troops helping the local population. Pat and his sister are my heroes. Please keep up the blog! I enjoy what you are doing and what is happening in your hectic life as a military wife. Not an easy job on your part or Pat’s part either. Keep using that beautiful smile.

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